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Rebecca Hoschke on juggling two careers and her passion for the sport

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With a third at Ironman Western Australia in December 2012 off the back of a solid run Rebecca Hoschke would be wrong to not aim for something similar at Ironman Melbourne this weekend. We caught up with her on the week before one of her biggest races of 2013. Hoschke won the Huskisson Long Course in 2012, Cairns half in 2011, 5th Ironman Cairns 2012, 1st at the Port Douglas half iron distance triathlon amongst many other great results.

A select group of pros get the lions share of the media so it is always good to have a chat to some of the athletes who quite often fly under the radar. Hoschke has such a passion for the sport and a great attitude that never waivers. We caught up with her during the week to find out a bit more about what drives her and how she made her way in to the sport.

TriZone: Tell us about your 3rd at Ironman Western Australia.

Rebecca Hoschke: Ironman Cairns June 2012 (5th) was a break through race – there was a lot I took away from this experience to further develop my potential.  I felt this result was another step forward towards putting the pieces of the puzzle together and race Ironman at a level I knew I was capable of.  I had a solid period of racing over Autumn 2012 followed by a specific 6 week IM prep leading into IMWA – my mind and body felt in great shape and I had a good feeling I was going to improve my result from Cairns.  My goal for IMWA was to remain connected with myself- to race smart, hard and with passion – a zone that I love and pushes my absolute limits.  To finish on the podium (3rd) and only a few minutes away from Bek (Rebecca Keat) and Britta (Martin) was a huge achievement for me – a result which exceeded my expectations and one I’m really proud of.

TriZone: When did you start racing triathlons and what got you started?

Rebecca on the way to running herself in to 3rd at IMWA 2012

Rebecca on the way to running herself in to 3rd at IMWA 2012

Rebecca Hoschke: After a 4 month backpacking trip around South America (2003/04) I needed to re-ground myself back in Sydney with my passion of running and signed up to Sydney marathon 2004!   I met a whole heap of triathletes in my running squad (Barry Golding Running Academy, Manly) and was instantly challenged by the sport.  Within a short matter of time, a new goal was created – Ironman Australia (have always been someone who jumps into the deep end of life!).  My first triathlon was Forster Half Ironman 2005 as a qualifier to my first Ironman experience – Ironman Australia 2006.  Grant Giles has been my coach and mentor from the beginning of my triathlon journey and has been instrumental to my progression in the sport and the athlete I have become today.

TZ: Who were your early influencers?

Bec: Two of my biggest inspirations right from the start included fellow triathletes and good friends Travis Bottomley and Patricia Cretin (Warringah Triathlon Club (Northern Beaches), Sydney).  Mel Ashton, Belinda Granger, Macca, Crowie and PJ are my local Aussie IM heros!  Nic Ward and her positive and supportive words of encouragement to have a go at stepping up from age group to open – which felt daunting at the time!  Pushing myself outside my comfort zone was a significant turning point, which opened new opportunity and challenge towards my progression as a professional triathlete.  I’m also a die-hard Chrissie Wellington fan, as close friends know well J (we share the same birthday, age and middle name which I thought was pretty cool).

I grew up on a rural property, northern NSW (little place called Kentucky) and went to school and University (UNE) in Armidale.  I have a BA of Urban and Regional Planning.  I’ve been working in Local Government, Sydney for 14+ years and currently work part time as an executive assessment officer (town planning/development assessment) for Ku-ring-gai Council who are incredibly supportive towards my working/triathlon lifestyle.

TZ: How has it been juggling a career and training full time for Iron distance races? Especially when you know you are going up against full time professional athletes?

Bec: Juggling a town planning career and pursing a passion in endurance sport is incredibly challenging – but probably reflects my personality – all or nothing, loves a challenge and to live life to the fullest!  I have an incredibly supportive husband who shares a common love in sport and the outdoors and have an amazing family, group of friends and a team of sporting specialists and practitioners behind me.  The most important thing is to make it work for me and get as much out of every experience and challenge as possible and enjoy the ride which comes with it J rather than focus or compare to others (situations which are outside my control).

With my improvements in the sport over time and change in sport/career goals, I find myself often re-assessing my lifestyle balance to stay fit, healthy and happy in all aspects of my life.  In 2011, I went part time at Council (4 days a week), which was a positive step forward towards managing the demands of the sport and my career as a town planner.  With my recent result at IMWA I have needed to re-assess my lifestyle balance again and make further adjustments to give myself the opportunity and space to continue developing my potential in the sport.   Living in Sydney doesn’t allow me to go full time professional, but I feel I’m very lucky to have a supportive work place, which is flexible towards my lifestyle and passion in life.

TZ: How do you get the most out of your training time?

Bec: Time management is critical in terms of organising training around my lifestyle.  Every training session and training block has a purpose – I’ve been working under the guidance of Grant Giles, Aeromax since 2006 and find his training philosophy works really well for me and program design is tailored well to my lifestyle.

TZ: What are your favourite training sessions?

Bec: I have always LOVED running for as long as I can remember!  Cheap and its free! Its my space and I love being outdoors, my favourite would be aerobic endurance run sessions with back end effort around the northern beaches.

TZ: What are your most memorable triathlon moments?

Bec: 1. Finishing my first Ironman 2006!  It was a pretty horrendous day (a lot of toilet stops!!!) and you never forget your first one!

2. Ironman Australia 2011 and seeing my husband, parents and close friends at the finish line and qualifying for Hawaii World Ironman Championships.

3. Finishing IMWA 2012 in 3rd place as a professional triathlete – a result I’m really proud of, reflecting how far I have come over the years – racing at a level and achieving results I never dreamed were possible when first starting the sport.

TZ: Why do you do Iron distance triathlons?

Bec: I love the mental and physical challenge which comes with the Ironman experience.  I see it very much as an individual sport, I’m my biggest competitor and I love personal challenge.  I also love the community spirit and atmosphere which comes with Ironman. it’s a special and unique experience, a personal journey which has had a huge influence on the person I am today.

TZ: Do you have a race strategy that you can tell us a bit about?

To race with a smile and go for it! 🙂 Trust your fitness, take risks, race by feel and without limits!  For me that is racing to my ultimate potential.  I have no fear in blowing up because you learn so much from every experience, how far you can push yourself to working out areas in your training which need improvement.  Gotta have a crack rather than look back wondering!

TZ: You have two more 70.3 Ironman events scheduled for this year plus your favourite race, Challenge Roth. What are your goals for these races?

Bec: I absolutely LOVE Challenge Roth (the best Ironman race on this planet!) but I may race IM Frankfurt as I like new challenges and racing events I haven’t raced before.  My goal for every race is to get as much out of every experience, continue working on areas that need improvement and test the work put in, through a racing environment.

I love racing and racing often – I’ve chosen high profile races (regional championships) this year to throw myself in the deep end and race amongst pro girls who are my inspiration and motivation in the sport to continue pushing my own personal potential.  You always walk away learning something from every experience and I love taking up any opportunity I can to get amongst it.

TZ: What are your long term plans?

Bec: As a professional triathlete my ultimate goal is to continue to improve my potential in the sport and have fun doing it – I’m addicted to good health, personal challenge and exercise with a smile J! I’ve recently obtained my Level 1 Coaching Certificate and once I feel I’ve achieved my own personal aspirations racing as a professional athlete I hope to continue being part of this sport and give back through mentoring and coaching and supporting the triathlon community where I can.  I’m also looking forward to having a family one day 🙂

With a third at Ironman Western Australia in December 2012 off the back of a solid run Skinfit sponsored athlete Rebecca Hoschke would be wrong to not aim for something similar at Ironman Melbourne this weekend. We caught up with her on the week before one of her biggest races of 2013.

Tell us about your 3rd at Ironman Western Australia.

Ironman Cairns June 2012 (5th) was a break through race – there was a lot I took away from this experience to further develop my potential.  I felt this result was another step forward towards putting the pieces of the puzzle together and race Ironman at a level I knew I was capable of.  I had a solid period of racing over Autumn 2012 followed by a specific 6 week IM prep leading into IMWA – my mind and body felt in great shape and I had a good feeling I was going to improve my result from Cairns.  My goal for IMWA was to remain connected with myself- to race smart, hard and with passion – a zone that I love and pushes my absolute limits.  To finish on the podium (3rd) and only a few minutes away from Bek (Rebecca Keat) and Britta (Martin) was a huge achievement for me – a result which exceeded my expectations and one I’m really proud of.

When did you start racing triathlons and what got you started?

After a 4 month backpacking trip around South America (2003/04) I needed to re-ground myself back in Sydney with my passion of running and signed up to Sydney marathon 2004!   I met a whole heap of triathletes in my running squad (Barry Golding Running Academy, Manly) and was instantly challenged by the sport.  Within a short matter of time, a new goal was created – Ironman Australia (have always been someone who jumps into the deep end of life!).  My first triathlon was Forster Half Ironman 2005 as a qualifier to my first Ironman experience – Ironman Australia 2006.  Grant Giles has been my coach and mentor from the beginning of my triathlon journey and has been instrumental to my progression in the sport and the athlete I have become today.

Who were your early influencers?

Two of my biggest inspirations right from the start included fellow triathletes and good friends Travis Bottomley and Patricia Cretin (Warringah Triathlon Club (Northern Beaches), Sydney).  Mel Ashton, Belinda Granger, Macca, Crowie and PJ are my local Aussie IM heros!  Nic Ward and her positive and supportive words of encouragement to have a go at stepping up from age group to open – which felt daunting at the time!  Pushing myself outside my comfort zone was a significant turning point, which opened new opportunity and challenge towards my progression as a professional triathlete.  I’m also a die-hard Chrissie Wellington fan, as close friends know well J (we share the same birthday, age and middle name which I thought was pretty cool).

I grew up on a rural property, northern NSW (little place called Kentucky) and went to school and University (UNE) in Armidale.  I have a BA of Urban and Regional Planning.  I’ve been working in Local Government, Sydney for 14+ years and currently work part time as an executive assessment officer (town planning/development assessment) for Ku-ring-gai Council who are incredibly supportive towards my working/triathlon lifestyle.

How has it been juggling a career and training full time for Iron distance races? Especially when you know you are going up against full time professionals?

Juggling a town planning career and pursing a passion in endurance sport is incredibly challenging – but probably reflects my personality – all or nothing, loves a challenge and to live life to the fullest!  I have an incredibly supportive husband who shares a common love in sport and the outdoors and have an amazing family, group of friends and a team of sporting specialists and practitioners behind me.  The most important thing is to make it work for me and get as much out of every experience and challenge as possible and enjoy the ride which comes with it J rather than focus or compare to others (situations which are outside my control).

With my improvements in the sport over time and change in sport/career goals, I find myself often re-assessing my lifestyle balance to stay fit, healthy and happy in all aspects of my life.  In 2011, I went part time at Council (4 days a week), which was a positive step forward towards managing the demands of the sport and my career as a town planner.  With my recent result at IMWA I have needed to re-assess my lifestyle balance again and make further adjustments to give myself the opportunity and space to continue developing my potential in the sport.   Living in Sydney doesn’t allow me to go full time professional, but I feel I’m very lucky to have a supportive work place, which is flexible towards my lifestyle and passion in life.

How do you get the most out of your training time?

Time management is critical in terms of organising training around my lifestyle.  Every training session and training block has a purpose – I’ve been working under the guidance of Grant Giles, Aeromax since 2006 and find his training philosophy works really well for me and program design is tailored well to my lifestyle.

What are your favourite training sessions?

I have always LOVED running for as long as I can remember!  Cheap and its free! Its my space and I love being outdoors, my favourite would be aerobic endurance run sessions with back end effort around the northern beaches.

What are your most memorable triathlon moments?

1. Finishing my first Ironman 2006!  It was a pretty horrendous day (a lot of toilet stops!!!) and you never forget your first one!  2. Ironman Australia 2011 and seeing my husband, parents and close friends at the finish line and qualifying for Hawaii World Ironman Championships.  3. Finishing IMWA 2012 in 3rd place as a professional triathlete – a result I’m really proud of, reflecting how far I have come over the years – racing at a level and achieving results I never dreamed were possible when first starting the sport.

Why do you do Iron distance triathlons?

I love the mental and physical challenge which comes with the Ironman experience.  I see it very much as an individual sport, I’m my biggest competitor and I love personal challenge.  I also love the community spirit and atmosphere which comes with Ironman. it’s a special and unique experience, a personal journey which has had a huge influence on the person I am today.

Do you have a race strategy that you can tell us a bit about?

To race with a smile and go for it! J Trust your fitness, take risks, race by feel and without limits!  For me that is racing to my ultimate potential.  I have no fear in blowing up because you learn so much from every experience, how far you can push yourself to working out areas in your training which need improvement.  Gotta have a crack rather than look back wondering!

You have two more 70.3 Ironman events scheduled for this year plus your favourite race, Challenge Roth. What are your goals for these races?

I absolutely LOVE Challenge Roth (the best Ironman race on this planet!) but I may race IM Frankfurt as I like new challenges and racing events I haven’t raced before.  My goal for every race is to get as much out of every experience, continue working on areas that need improvement and test the work put in, through a racing environment.

I love racing and racing often – I’ve chosen high profile races (regional championships) this year to throw myself in the deep end and race amongst pro girls who are my inspiration and motivation in the sport to continue pushing my own personal potential.  You always walk away learning something from every experience and I love taking up any opportunity I can to get amongst it.

What are your long term plans?

As a professional triathlete my ultimate goal is to continue to improve my potential in the sport and have fun doing it – I’m addicted to good health, personal challenge and exercise with a smile J! I’ve recently obtained my Level 1 Coaching Certificate and once I feel I’ve achieved my own personal aspirations racing as a professional athlete I hope to continue being part of this sport and give back through mentoring and coaching and supporting the triathlon community where I can.  I’m also looking forward to having a family one day 🙂

 

Karl is a keen age group triathlete who races more than he trains. Good life balance! Karl works in the media industry in Australia and is passionate about the sport of triathlon.

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Super League: Corporate Mix Teams Hungry for the Lead

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The run course along the Elizabeth Marina board walk. Photo: Googsi Creative / The Studio M

In the second day of Super League Jersey Corporate Mix racing, Team Comprop is once again leading the rankings, its members coming out firing on all cylinders to win the team relay race against 16 other teams from nine corporate entities. First Names Group Team 2 and the Ravenscroft Titans followed across the finish line, maintaining the top three overall. Like in Day 1, the competition was held over the Sprint Pursuit format, which involves racing over a 300-meter swim around the Elizabeth Marina, a 5-kilometer cycle leg on a cobblestoned and technical course and a 2-kilometer run done over two stages with a pursuit-style start in Stage 2.

Team Comprop is still in the lead after two days of racing. Photo: Googsi Creative / The Studio M

Team Comprop and First Names Group Team 2 took first and second respectively in both Sprint Pursuit stages, but the Jersey Triathlon Club Junior Team 1 put up a brave fight to take third in Stage 1. The Ravenscroft Titans had a slow start off the blocks and crossed the Stage 1 line in ninth place, but made up for their deficit and recovered third place in Stage 2.

The Corporate Mix overall win relies on the total of a team’s points garnered from their relay finish position and the points from their pro male and female athletes’ finish positions. Team Comprop has pro men’s leader Kristian Blummenfelt on its roster while First Names Group Team 2 has women’s leader Katie Zaferes, and if both athletes hold their form, they will deliver the top two spots in the Corporate Mix to their teams.

Both teams from Santander International may have a chance to rise higher in the overall rankings with better finishes today than yesterday. Their pro athletes Fernando Alarza and Carolina Routier will certainly do their best to better yesterday’s results in their Eliminator races later today. The Eliminator will put them through three stages of swim-bike-run, with only the fastest 15 and then the fastest 10 getting through to the next stages. It will remain to be seen whether they can get to finish and earn those all-important series points.

Corporate Mix swimmers line up for their pontoon start. Photo: Googsi Creative / The Studio M

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Recovery Smoothie – Supercharged Green and Berry Smoothie

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Photo: Shutterstock

After a long hard workout I like to get fueled right away. I find it easiest for me to get down a smoothie rather than solid food. By making a smoothie I am able to pack it full of nutrient dense foods. Below is my “go to” –

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Green & Berry Super Smoothie

Ingredients

  • 16 oz Coconut water
  • 8 oz Hemp milk
  • 1 Banana
  • 2 cups Baby Spinach
  • 1 cup Frozen Blueberries
  • 6 leaves Tuscan Kale
  • ½ Gold beet large
  • ½ nugget of fresh turmeric root
  • 1 serving Favorite plant based protein powder I use Vega Performance protein berry flavor for this
  • 2 tbsp Chia seed
  • 1 tbsp Acai powder
  • 1 tbsp Maca powder
  • 1 tbsp Spirulina
  • 4 large ice cubes

Instructions

  1. Place all ingredients into a high power blender such as Vita mix. Process until smooth. Consistency can be adjusted with cold water as you are processing.

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Super League: Katie Zaferes stuns in Triple Mix on Day 1

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Katie Zaferes of the USA stunned dual Olympic medalist Nicola Spirig at the inaugural Super League Triathlon women’s race in Jersey, Channel Islands. The ascendant American was never too far off the front throughout, and took the overall win with a 19-second lead over the speedy Swiss. Compatriot Summer Cook rounded out the first women’s podium for the revolutionary race series. Triple Mix is a three-stage race with a 10-minute break between stages and a pursuit-style start in Stages 2 and 3.

Stage 1: Swim-Bike-Run

Carolina Routier, Sophie Coldwell, and Emma Jeffcoat found clear water off the pontoon start and came out of the 300-meter swim together, but most of the athletes emerged together to form a huge chase pack which swallowed the lead swimmers once on the bike leg.

Coldwell and British compatriot Jodie Stimpson worked to put pressure through the first few laps of the five-kilometer bike ride. With the field splintering between a large front group and solo athletes trying to bridge the gap, those off the back fell victim to the 90-second elimination rule. Sameera Al Bitar found herself more than 90 seconds behind the lead athlete and was forced to retire partway through the bike.

Pontoon start for the Women’s Triple Mix Stage 1 of Super League in Jersey. Photo: Googsi Creative / The Studio M

Stimpson, Coldwell, and Claire Michel of Belgium came off the bike together, but with the athletes so close together, Spirig emerged out front with Zaferes right on her shoulders. Summer Cook managed to stay in contention despite struggling with the technical bike course, while Lucy Hall and Mariya Shorets were eliminated after the bike leg.

During the two-kilometer run, Michel, Spirig, and Zaferes took turns out front, but it was Michel who took the tape ahead of Spirig and Zaferes. Cook ran herself into fourth.

Stage 2: Run-Bike-Swim

With only 10 minutes to recover before starting another two-kilometer run and only seconds separating the lead three women, it didn’t take long for Zaferes to move up front. However, Spirig, Cook, and Michel came with her surge to create a 20-second gap to chasers Stimpson, Coldwell, and Rachel Klamer.

Jodie Stimpson, Sophie Coldwell, and Rachel Klamer run as a chase group. Photo: Googsi Creative / The Studio M

Spirig put pressure on and gapped the leaders with her trademark bike power and great handling, but after a while Zaferes answered the surge. Apparently, Zaferes had thought one of her tires had gone flat, but once confirmed that was not the case, she confidently rode back onto Spirig’s back wheel before taking the front into transition.

Zaferes made sure to hit the water ahead of Spirig, and her stellar technique ensured she crossed the Stage 2 finish line first.

Thanks to the gap the two had created to the rest of the field, an additional seven women were eliminated, while Laura Lindemann took a nasty bike spill but was able to continue.

Stage 3: Bike-Swim-Run

The Swiss-American tandem played tag team throughout the opening bike leg, maintaining their lead while a race for third happened behind them. Coldwell teamed up with Kirsten Kasper to leave the rest of the field, but once the race entered the water the athletes bunched up again while Zaferes and Spirig stayed clear.

Out onto the run, Zaferes began stretching her legs and her lead to Spirig, who was never able to reclaim the front. The former collegiate track star made the final few hundred meters of the run look easy, celebrating into the finish chute.

Katie Zaferes and Nicola Spirig riding hard. Photo: Googsi Creative / The Studio M

“When I first got on the bike I was a little off technically with the corners, but I got more comfortable and moved up and was happy with how the race progressed as it got on,” Zaferes said. “The swim feels as horrible as all the boys told us it did, so at least I was prepared for that and didn’t panic. I felt nervous especially after having raced last weekend, but I felt good. I really hope to approach tomorrow just like I did today and hope the same result comes away from it, but Day 2 gets significantly harder. I’ll go for it for sure though.”

It has been only a few months since Spirig gave birth to her second child, but today’s race showed she is still one of the most fearsome athletes to contend with on any starting line. She said, “Thank you very much for all the support from all of you. It has been great being here. I was just, it was amazing, I had good fun and I hope I’m a bit of an inspiration for all moms.”

Meanwhile, Cook used her stellar run to take herself into third place overall, the youngest on the Triple Mix podium. She said, “I’m feeling really good about today, I wasn’t sure about what to expect coming in; I felt like it could go either way. I was really proud of myself to just go out there and compete, not be afraid to put myself close to the front and just race my hardest. I haven’t really thought about tactics going into tomorrow yet. I’m kind of just trying to stay in the moment today and focus on what I needed to do. I guess I’ll have some thinking about a strategy to do tonight.”

There is one more day of racing to go to claim the first Super League Triathlon women’s trophy. These athletes will have to give it their all to stay on top. The Eliminator awaits, and only the fastest will survive.

Jodie Stimpson, Sophie Coldwell, and Rachel Klamer run as a chase group. Photo: Googsi Creative / The Studio M

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Super League: Kristian Blummenfelt takes out the Triple Mix on Day 1

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Kristian Blummenfelt of Norway blasted away in the final half-kilometer to finish the overall winner for today’s Triple Mix at Super League Jersey after staying out in front all day with South Africa’s Richard Murray and British crowd favorite and dual Olympic medalist Jonathan Brownlee.

Triple Mix is a three-stage race with a 10-minute break between stages and a pursuit-style start in Stages 2 and 3.

Stage 1: Swim-Bike-Run

While Jake Birtwhistle received pole position on the pontoon at yesterday’s slot draw and led out of the 300-meter swim that kicked off Stage 1, Brownlee was right on his shoulder and got the jump out of transition onto the 5-kilometer bike leg. After five laps over the flat yet technical YESSS Power bike course going over cobblestones and through tight dead turns, the Australian contingent of Birtwhistle, Matt Hauser, and Aaron Royle took the lead. It was on the run where Brownlee, Blummenfelt, and Murray asserted the dominance that would mark the rest of the race regardless of what order swimming, biking, and running would take.

Pontoon start of Triple Mix Stage 1 of the Super League triathlon in Jersey. Photo: Googsi Creative / The Studio M

Blummenfelt finished the two-kilometer run in first, with Murray and Brownlee in close pursuit. Olympic Bronze medalist Henri Schoeman came in a distant fourth as the rest of the field splintered into smaller chase groups.

Stage 2: Run-Bike-Swim

After a 10-minute break, the pursuit-based start for Stage 2 sent the top three off on the run with an 11-second lead. In the hands of these fleet-footed athletes those 10 seconds quickly ballooned to call into play the 90-second elimination rule. With a time gap of greater than 90 seconds to the leader, Ben Shaw was eliminated unceremoniously, as were Dan Halksworth, Crisanto Grajales Valencia, and Joao Pereira.

After a 10-minute break, the pursuit-based start for Stage 2 sent the top three off on the run with an 11-second lead. In the hands of these fleet-footed athletes those 10 seconds quickly ballooned to call into play the 90-second elimination rule. With a time gap of greater than 90 seconds to the leader, Ben Shaw was eliminated unceremoniously, as were Dan Halksworth, Crisanto Grajales Valencia, and Joao Pereira.

Jonathan Brownlee on the run. Photo: Googsi Creative / The Studio M

Once on their bikes, Blummenfelt, Murray, and Brownlee worked together to grow a monstrous lead with clear road behind them. Still joined at the hip by the time they jumped back into the water, Brownlee surged ahead by a few strokes leaving Murray to chase him through the finish chute. Schoeman kept fourth place with a great swim after slipping backwards in the bike pack, while reigning world champion Mario Mola crept up into sixth.

Stage 3: Bike-Swim-Run

The final stage of Triple Mix started with the bike leg. With the big three once again out in front, the stage saw a few more eliminated by the 90-second rule including pre-race swim favorite Richard Varga and world number five Fernando Alarza. Ben Dijkstra crashed out on the bike leg, leaving British hopes entirely in the capable hands of Brownlee.

Once into the swim, the three men played tactical, holding positions with Brownlee out in front, Murray sitting on his feet, and Blummenfelt just a little further back. The race would be decided on the run.

It was Blummenfelt who had a bit more gas in the tank as he and Murray dueled through the run leg; ultimately, the Norwegian sprinted ahead for the day’s win. Their race-within-a-race relegated Brownlee to third place, while Schoeman held strong in fourth.

The peloton rides past during the bike leg of the Triple Mix on Day 1 of Super League in Jersey. Photo: Googsi Creative / The Studio M

“It feels so good. Especially Murray he’s really strong on the run so I wasn’t really sure of a way to get him but super pleased. I think the fact that we started the next stage with a gap played a huge role. We went hard in the beginning and kept going and worked well together,” said Blummenfelt, who is third in the year-end world rankings. “My plan was actually to stay a little bit more calm in the first stage but it’s too hard with this many people around cheering you on. I didn’t plan to go that hard in the beginning but seems the day played out well.”

Brownlee, a first-time racer in the Super League Triathlon formats, had a bit of adjusting to do. He said, “I took out the start in the first swim and it was full on and we had to keep going. And then I made a mistake there towards the end and it cost me the race… I’m really tired but I’ve got to do it all again tomorrow. I had the advantage of a home crowd, and it’s great to see lots of Jersey people around supporting me, so thank you.”

Defending champion Murray did not lack in taking his chances on the day. “I realized it was a four-kilometer run on the trot and I decided that was the moment to try and go for it today. Luckily I had these two men next to me to come with and it was definitely a really hard day. It was my first breakaway ever and the crowd was amazing and it’s very hard to be in a breakaway so kudos to the guys who do it every race,” he said. “Blummenfelt managed to get the better of me today but it was great from these two guys.”

Blummenfelt now sits atop the point standings with 25 points. Murray is four points behind at 21, while Brownlee has gained 18. This gives them plenty of wiggle room to take out the overall win tomorrow after the Eliminator, but as today’s race has showed, you need to race every stage like you want to win it.

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Wahoo Fitness Announces Partnership with Superstar Jan Frodeno

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Wahoo bolsters its elite athlete program with the addition of two-time Ironman World Champion and Olympic gold medalist Jan Frodeno

Wahoo Fitness, the leader in workout apps and connected fitness devices, has just announced an official partnership with Olympic champion and two-time Ironman World Champion Jan Frodeno. Given the unique, multi-sport training requirements of triathlon, the Wahoo product ecosystem is perfectly tailored to maximize efforts and enhance the performance of all triathletes, including those competing at the world’s most elite levels, like Frodeno.

As an official partner, Wahoo’s complete ecosystem of innovative products will be supporting Frodeno’s training efforts. This includes the dual-band TICKR X Heart Rate Monitor, the powerful and aerodynamic ELEMNT BOLT GPS cycling computer, and Wahoo’s acclaimed indoor stationary smart bike trainer; the KICKR, whose signature flywheel technology replicates the smooth feel of the road. Rounding out the Wahoo ecosystem is the groundbreaking new KICKR CLIMB, a grade simulator which enables Frodeno to replicate the resistance and grade changes found on the profiles of real-world TT courses, providing a competitive edge unmatched by any other indoor trainer.

Frodeno, like other Wahoo athletes including Tour de France-winning Team Sky, will play a key role by providing direct input into the design and development of future Wahoo products ensuring they are tailored to meet the needs of the most demanding professional athletes. This valuable insight will help ensure Wahoo products continue to remain best-in-class for triathletes with the highest performance standards.

“I’ve always considered myself a Wahooligan, as I’ve been using Wahoo products to support my training efforts for many years, but now I’m happy to say it’s official,” says Wahoo’s newest athlete Jan Frodeno. “It’s very important to me that the brand cares about delivering a seamless user experience between each of its products – and Wahoo’s full ecosystem suits my training needs perfectly, enabling me to train with greater efficiency than ever before,” continues Frodeno.

“We’re extremely proud to introduce such an incredible athlete to the ‘Wahooligan’ family,” says Chip Hawkins, Wahoo Fitness CEO. “It’s long been Wahoo’s mission to support the performance of athletes at all levels, and our product ecosystem is uniquely positioned to provide a truly comprehensive, connected training experience for discerning weekend warriors and elite triathletes like Frodeno who demand nothing but the absolute best.”

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First-ever Super League Triathlon Corporate Mix draws competitive local teams

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The first-ever Super League Triathlon Corporate Mix commenced this morning in Jersey with Team Comprop finishing out front, followed by the Ravenscroft Titans and First Names Group Team 2 in second and third place in a thrilling sprint finish. With 17 teams from nine different corporate entities competing, the Corporate Mix has allowed the local community and businesses to be part of what has become one of Jersey’s biggest sporting events. Local teams were in fact among the most competitive, with the top six fastest teams coming from the Channel Islands.

Comprop is a leading privately owned property developer of both commercial and residential sites in Jersey and Guernsey. Its corporate mix team is composed of some of Jersey’s most dedicated athletes including pro coach Nick Saunders and full-time triathlete Ollie Turner.

After assessing the course and the safety needs of what were largely age-group participants, race officials decided to change the Corporate Mix run course to follow the pier, instead of taking place on the same section of road as the bike course since not all cyclists would be off the course by the time the first runners would start.

Officials also implemented the Sprint Pursuit format instead of the planned Enduro (nonstop swim-bike-run-swim-bike-run). The Sprint Pursuit involved two stages of swim-bike-run with ten minutes of rest between stages. At the start of the second stage, swimmers were released by the previous stage’s finish order as well as the time gaps between their team finishes.

Though out for the rest of the season due to hip surgery, Alistair Brownlee found a way to be a part of Super League Jersey, pinch-hitting as a swimmer for the MaccaNOW Foundation team. It was one very special highlight not just for the Corporate Mix competitors to swim alongside the dual Olympic gold medalist, but also for the Jersey locals who thronged the barricades to join the festivities and spectate.

While Team Comprop currently rules the leaderboard, the corporate teams’ final standing today will be determined by how their sponsored championship athletes perform in the men’s and women’s races happening later.

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